Student news of Olympia High School

The Olympus

Student news of Olympia High School

The Olympus

Student news of Olympia High School

The Olympus

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Sephora chaos: 10 year-olds rampage, products ruined

“Jill, tell me! When did it become my daughter’s duty to invest her interest in products of beauty? The girl is only ten!” – Jared Goldsmith, “Sephora”
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The Summer Fridays Jet Lag mask is prominently displayed, but it appears to have been handled by the children and is now in disarray.
Zoe Lytle
The Summer Fridays Jet Lag mask is prominently displayed, but it appears to have been handled by the children and is now in disarray.

Sephora is the place for beauty products. But people’s favorite products are being taken by children who want them. 

There has been a concerning trend on social media platforms such as TikTok and Youtube Shorts, where young children between the ages of 9-12 spend excessive amounts on skincare and beauty products. 

This trend has led to groups of 4-5 kids flocking into Sephora and disrupting the store by ruining test products. Additionally, there have been reports of these children misbehaving by drawing mustaches on the pictures of makeup models.

“I haven’t gotten any back-talk, the kids are usually polite. But they damage the testers,” says Ulta employee Ellie.

These child consumers tend to purchase certain high-end skincare products such as Drunk Elephant, Glow Recipe, Summer Friday, and Sol De Janeiro.

Ulta’s Smoke N Roses pressed powder palette, all over the display, with the shades scratched out. (Zoe Lytle)

These brands may significantly influence the younger demographic due to their unique marketing strategies and use of social media platforms, which may be targeted to younger audiences.

Young individuals are using certain anti-aging products on their social media to achieve what they describe as a “preppy” look. Parents are concerned about the potential long-term effects and negative impact on self-image and self-esteem that these unnecessary products may cause.

“I don’t need them. I just like having them,” says Natalie Cissina, a self-proclaimed “Sephora kid.” She contends that she has no inherent need for the cosmetics she owns, but finds comfort in their presence.

These products are similar to toys. This sentiment speaks to the complex relationship that even young kids can have with consumerism – sometimes advertising is so enticing, that people forget to consider how useful the product will truly be for them.

The viral Sephora trends circulating on TikTok and YouTube Shorts are gaining traction rapidly and may do more harm than good. It is also highly concerning that some young individuals, who didn’t even consider  Sephora or Ulta a store they would ever frequent six months ago, are causing costly damage throughout these renowned beauty stores.

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